BUDGET REACTION: Family finances hit by biggest ever productivity growth downgrade

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Public Finances and the Economy

Chancellor makes housing a welcome centrepiece of his Budget The Chancellor has delivered the first post-election giveaway Budget this century despite a grim outlook for the economy and public finances, driven by the Office for Budget Responsibility’s biggest ever productivity downgrade. That downgrade has huge implications for family finances over the remainder of the parliament, … Continued

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Will building more homes help to reduce housing costs?

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Housing, Wealth and Debt, Intergenerational Commission

As part of the Foundation’s ongoing housing work, leading economist and Intergenerational Commission member Kate Barker and Housing market analyst Neal Hudson write about the impact that boosting housing supply could have on prices and wider housing costs.   Since the mid-2000s the dominant narrative about housing in the UK has been around a shortage … Continued

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Will the (Scottish) Budget raise income tax rates?

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Tax and Welfare

With the UK Budget imminent, it’s important not to forget proposals released in Scotland earlier this month. These could lead to increases in income tax rates as soon as April, intended to protect public services and benefits in Scotland. This would be a departure from the usual direction of travel in the UK: there has … Continued

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It’s time to stop feeling sorry for the Chancellor – there’s no excuse for a do nothing Budget

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Public Finances and the Economy

It’s all the rage to feel sorry for Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer. Philip Hammond is an unlucky man we’re told, having to prepare a Budget against a backdrop of a weaker economy, worse public finances and pressure to relaunch a government that’s had a tough Autumn. Those pressures are real, and no-one’s doubting that … Continued

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We need to put the changing world of work back in the spotlight

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Jobs, Skills and Pay

Angst over diminishing attention spans is widespread these days, with the reaction to Twitter’s expansion to 280 characters a case in point. That’s long been true in politics: even the most important of issues need a regular drumbeat to maintain public interest. And it certainly applies to the problems highlighted by the Taylor Review of … Continued

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