A-typical year?

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Wages & Income

Atypical is an apt word for describing 2016. From the celebrity death rate to decisions at the ballot box in the UK and America that are fundamentally reshaping politics, there’s a definite sense of disruption. And so it was in the labour market. Granted, 2016 wasn’t the year when atypical working patterns broke into the … Continued

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Mind the representation gap

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Work & Security

We’ve heard a lot about fairness between the generations recently. Housing is normally the issue at hand. After all, home ownership is becoming an ever more distant dream for a growing number of millennials. As a result, twenty somethings are now spending £44,000 more on rent during their 20s than the baby boomers did. And … Continued

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Rich world problems are irrelevant across most of the country, but poverty matters throughout Britain

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Wages & Income

On Friday the ONS, publisher of official statistics, released some “NOT official” statistics on people’s incomes for every local authority in England and Wales. This is pretty exciting stuff but before I outline some of the key findings from the data, the ONS require I make clear that: These Research Outputs are NOT official statistics … Continued

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How did firms pay for the big pay rise in 2016? Through productivity and price rises, not job losses

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Wages & Income

2016 marked the introduction of a big, controversial new player on the political economy scene, whose influence is set to grow and grow over the next four years. No, this isn’t a blog about President-Elect Trump. For millions of low earners across the UK, another development has had an even bigger impact. The National Living … Continued

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