How do the main parties’ fiscal policies compare?

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Fiscal Choices

The parties’ manifestos cover a lot of ground. But what would their fiscal policies mean for the country? As we set out in an earlier report, boring-sounding rules about the deficit matter hugely for the country’s public debt trajectory, the parties’ delivery of services and tax and benefit policies, and for accommodating coming demographic challenges. … Continued

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Labour’s manifesto: let’s focus on the big choices not the small change

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Fiscal Choices

Labour’s manifesto is a big deal, in the simple sense that it has a lot of stuff in it. Nationalising this, nationalising that. Scrapping tuition fees. Borrowing billions for investment. Higher taxes, from corporation tax to financial transactions and on those earning over £80,000. More spending on health, social care, schools, and childcare. Oh, and … Continued

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Walking the walk on backing low and middle income households

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Fiscal Choices

Manifestos matter. Not so much because they change the results of elections (they don’t). They matter both because they do determine much of what parties do when they actually win, and because they tell you a lot about where a party stands at a given point in time – what they see the big challenges facing … Continued

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Older people on lower incomes are being ignored

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Fiscal Choices

To triple lock or not to triple lock (the state pension). Who has a secret tax bombshell ready for hard working families? It’s not just the rows that are being repeated in what feels something like an election on autopilot, it’s also the groups of voters that the parties are focusing on: pensioners and the … Continued

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Prepare for a pay squeeze as big as in the 1810s

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Fiscal Choices

The early 21st century doesn’t have too much in common – thankfully – with the war-torn early 19th century (Although a global superpower was headed by a man of dubious temperament). But Autumn Statement 2016 and the first official projections of the impact of Brexit on the UK’s economy added an unfortunate new connection. If … Continued

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