Healthy finances? Options for funding an NHS spending increase

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Public Finances and the Economy

The National Health Service will turn 70 on 5 July 2018, but public concern about its condition is at its highest since the early 2000s. This mirrors notable declines in many performance measures over recent years, which have taken place against a backdrop of historically low rises in NHS spending. And looking ahead, funding pressures … Continued

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An unhealthy interest? Debt distress and the consequences of raising rates

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Housing, Wealth and Debt

Standing at nearly £1.9 trillion, UK household debt remains a big issue. It is one that has very real and very obvious relevance for those families having to meet repayment commitments. But it is one that has macroeconomic implications too: the debt hangover that has endured over the past decade has undoubtedly hampered the UK’s … Continued

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Ending austerity? The priorities, price tags and practicalities for a government changing course on spending cuts

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Public Finances and the Economy

Britain is seven years into a prolonged period of fiscal consolidation, in which constraints on public spending have been the central feature and are set to continue for some years to come. Following the general election  there has been a significant debate about the extent to which the result – and the failure of the … Continued

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The pay deficit: measuring the effect of pension deficit payments on workers’ wages

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Jobs, Skills and Pay, Intergenerational Commission, Tax and Welfare

Across the UK economy, the share of overall employee compensation accounted for by non-wage elements such as employer pension contributions has increased substantially since 2000. This increase was driven in no small part by increased payments by employers to plug defined benefit deficits and coincided with a marked pre-crisis slowdown in pay growth, causing speculation … Continued

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