Labour market
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Quality and security
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Universal Credit
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Pay

Irregular Payments: Assessing the breadth and depth of month to month earnings volatility

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This research addresses the question of earnings volatility, unearthing striking findings about the lived experience of work – and the pay we receive for it – in the UK today. This report makes use of anonymised transaction data from over seven million Lloyds Banking Group (LBG) accounts in order to demonstrate the breadth and depth of changes in pay from month to month.

Living standards
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Welfare
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Political parties and elections

Still just about managing? Pre-election briefing on the main political parties’ welfare policies

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Our pre-election series of briefing notes have so far centred on the main parties’ approaches to deficit reduction and to tax. To complete the fiscal ‘set’ we must also consider their take on welfare. This note explores future welfare challenges for an incoming government and examines the extent to which the differing party commitments might … Continued

Living standards
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Globalisation
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Welfare

You’re hired! Lessons for President Trump from a comparison of living standards and inequality in the US and the UK

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This report sets out how, despite moving in step politically of late, the US and the UK economies have had somewhat different economic experiences since the financial crisis. The most notable divergence is on employment – the issue that President Trump put at the front and centre of his economic pitch to voters. As the … Continued

Living standards
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Budgets & fiscal events
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Incomes
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Public spending
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Economy and public finances
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Welfare

Under New Management: options for supporting ‘just managing’ families at the Autumn Statement

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The new Prime Minister has been very clear in her determination to put the interests of ‘just managing’ families at the heart of her government, but she has inherited tax and benefit plans which are set to lower incomes for many in the group over the remainder of the parliament. With post-EU referendum revisions to projections for … Continued

Social care
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Labour market
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Low pay
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Pay
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Minimum wage

Rising to the challenge: early evidence on the introduction of the National Living Wage in the social care sector

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While broadly welcomed by business, the introduction of the National Living Wage (NLW) – the new higher minimum wage for workers aged 25 and over – has sparked some concerns about affordability and prompted discussions around likely employment responses – especially in lower-paying sectors where the wage increase is set to bite hardest. It will … Continued

Budgets & fiscal events
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Public spending
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Economy and public finances
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Welfare

A Budget for workers? The impact of the Summer Budget on work incentives in Universal Credit

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The combination of increases in the minimum wage (via the introduction of a National Living Wage), cuts to income tax and sharp reductions in working-age welfare presented in the Summer Budget produces a complex mix of winners and losers. Those not currently in receipt of benefits and tax credits (or Universal Credit) are likely to … Continued

Universal Credit
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Welfare

Credit where it’s due? Assessing the benefits and risks of Universal Credit

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The government’s plans for Universal Credit (UC) were first set out in November 2010, and its concept has received broad cross-party support. But the process of implementation has been dogged by a series of delays – the OBR now anticipates that it will not be fully rolled out until at least 2020, potentially 3 years … Continued

Social care
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Pay
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Living Wage

As if we cared: the costs and benefits of a living wage for social care workers

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This report is the culmination of a year-long investigation into pay and conditions in social care, and the first authoritative study of the costs and benefits of moving to a living wage for all care workers. The report argues that pervasive low pay across the sector and tight budget constraints facing care providers means that paying … Continued

Social care
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Low pay
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Pay
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Minimum wage

The scale of minimum wage underpayment in social care

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There is increasing recognition that a better deal for the workforce will be essential to the quality and sustainability of social care provision in the UK, but so far there has been scant evidence as to the scale of investment needed. The Resolution Foundation is currently undertaking a major investigation into the costs of improving … Continued

Universal Credit: A policy under review

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Resolution Foundation has brought together an expert panel of labour market economists, welfare specialists, employment practitioners and other experts to review the current design of Universal Credit and its likely impacts and propose changes that would make the policy more likely to support people to get into and progress in work. The cumulative impact of … Continued

Childcare
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Welfare

World Class: What does international evidence tell us about improving quality, access and affordability in the English childcare market

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A new Resolution Foundation report by leading childcare experts, Kitty Stewart of the LSE and Ludovica Gambaro of the Institute of Education, sets out a path for reform for the UK, offering the best ideas from abroad. Central to getting greater value for the £5.5 billion we already invest in childcare as well as future … Continued

Labour market
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Universal Credit
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Childcare
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Welfare

All work and no pay: Second earners’ work incentives and childcare costs under Universal Credit

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A part-time cleaner with two children in childcare and working 25 hours a week would be £7 a week worse off than if she didn’t work at all while a part-time teacher with the same hours and childcare arrangements would be £57 a week better off under the Government’s new proposals to help working families … Continued

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